Sunday, December 31, 2017

2017 in review

(Past annual reviews: 20162015, 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, and 2004.)

Off the blog... Mostly I've been occupied this year by the arrival of this little guy:


Professionally, I was delighted to finally find a good home for my 'Willpower Satisficing' paper (in Noûs!).  'Why Care About Non-Natural Reasons?' was accepted by APQ.  And a couple of previously-accepted papers -- 'Knowing What Matters' and 'Rethinking the Asymmetry' -- appeared in print, while 'Fittingness Objections to Consequentialism' was officially approved for an OUP-edited volume.  Busy times!


On the blog...

Applied Ethics

* A series of posts took a critical look at a healthcare fiasco unfolding in the UK which our family experienced first-hand: UK shuts down Independent Midwives, Medical Indemnity: Protection or Compensation?, and Assessing the NMC's Defense of its Independent Midwifery Ban.

* Universalizing Tactical Voting rebuts the moral objection to tactical voting.

* Anomaly vs Huemer on Immigration -- explaining why the default presumption should be to favour freer immigration.


Moral Theory

* Aggregating the Right Moments addresses one intuitive reason for thinking that it'd be better to give one person half a million minutes (i.e. one year) more life than to give a million people one minute more each.

* Nanoseconds that Matter explains why even arbitrarily small durations of time should not be assumed to lack value entirely.

* Harms, Benefits, and Framing Effects defends the existence of 'framing effects' against the objections of a recently published paper.

* Iterating Badness in the Paradox of Deontology explores an objection to Setiya's new paper, 'Must Consequentialists Kill?'

* Drawing the Consequentialism/Deontology Distinction does just what it says on the tin.


Other

* Our Zombie Bodies, and Physicalist Epiphenomenalism discusses the idea that our mental properties should not be attributed to our physical bodies in addition to our person, and so our bodies are, in a sense, philosophical zombies.

* Intelligible Non=Natural Concerns explores exceptions to the rule that we shouldn't care about morality 'de dicto'.


Happy New Year!

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