Tuesday, June 27, 2006

Moral Philosophy Quiz

Here's another fun one (via Dr Freeride):
The list below is modified by your input. The results are scored on a curve. The highest score, 100, represents the closest philosophical match to your reponses. This is not to say that you and the philosopher are in total agreement...

1. John Stuart Mill (100%)
2. Kant (93%)
3. Epicureans (80%)
4. Jeremy Bentham (76%)
5. Aquinas (73%)
6. Jean-Paul Sartre (69%)
7. Ayn Rand (67%)
8. Aristotle (67%)
9. Ockham (53%)
10. Prescriptivism (52%)
11. Stoics (37%)
12. St. Augustine (36%)
13. Spinoza (34%)
14. Nietzsche (28%)
15. Plato (27%)
16. Cynics (24%)
17. Thomas Hobbes (24%)
18. Nel Noddings (17%)
19. David Hume (16%)

9 comments:

  1. 1. Aristotle (100%)
    2. John Stuart Mill (84%)
    3. Kant (81%)
    4. David Hume (81%)
    5. Aquinas (80%)
    6. Ayn Rand (80%)
    7. Nietzsche (77%)
    8. Jeremy Bentham (75%)
    9. Jean-Paul Sartre (68%)
    10. Prescriptivism (68%)
    11. Nel Noddings (67%)
    12. Thomas Hobbes (66%)
    13. Epicureans (54%)
    14. Spinoza (53%)
    15. Plato (51%)
    16. Ockham (50%)
    17. Stoics (43%)
    18. St. Augustine (37%)
    19. Cynics (31%)

    I'm highly suspicious of any test that seems to hold that Ayn Rand is an ethical philosopher, or, really, any sort of philosopher at all.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Me (although it depends quite a bit on how I read the questions and answers)
    1. Jeremy Bentham (100%)
    2. John Stuart Mill (82%)
    3. Aquinas (81%)
    4. Jean-Paul Sartre (62%)
    5. Kant (60%)
    6. Aristotle (59%)
    7. Plato (52%)
    8. Spinoza (45%)
    9. Epicureans (42%)
    10. Prescriptivism (40%)
    11. St. Augustine (35%)
    12. Thomas Hobbes (31%)
    13. Cynics (27%)
    14. Ayn Rand (27%)
    15. Nel Noddings (25%)
    16. Ockham (23%)
    17. Stoics (18%)
    18. David Hume (15%)
    19. Nietzsche (7%)

    DP,
    What is disturbing is that you seem to agree 80% with her!

    ReplyDelete
  3. I’m pretty happy with it – even when I read the questions differently it just promoted Ockham and Kant a little but overall not much difference
    and Nietzsche and Ayn Rand down the bottom group (athough I have some sympathy for Hume) and JB and JSM up the top. perfect.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Universalize this! :-) (though I'm kind of horrified at #5.)


    1. Kant (100%)
    2. John Stuart Mill (67%)
    3. Jeremy Bentham (61%)
    4. Prescriptivism (58%)
    5. Ayn Rand (52%)
    6. Aquinas (47%)
    7. Stoics (45%)
    8. Jean-Paul Sartre (41%)
    9. Aristotle (39%)
    10. Spinoza (38%)
    11. St. Augustine (36%)
    12. Ockham (32%)
    13. Plato (30%)
    14. Epicureans (28%)
    15. Nel Noddings (23%)
    16. Cynics (20%)
    17. David Hume (20%)
    18. Nietzsche (20%)
    19. Thomas Hobbes

    ReplyDelete
  5. so far your readers (including yourself) are collectively

    Aquinas 75%
    Kant 72%
    John Stuart Mill69.2%
    Jeremy Bentham 66.8%
    Aristotle 63.6%
    St Augustine 58.2%
    Spinoza 56.2%
    Jean-Paul Sartre53.4%
    Plato 53%
    Ayn Rand 50.4%
    Prescriptivism 48.4%
    Ockham 43.8%
    Stoics 39.6%
    Epicureans 39.6%
    Nel Noddings 39.4%
    David Hume 34.2%
    Nietzsche 32.4%
    Cynics 31.4%
    Thomas Hobbes 27.4%

    ReplyDelete
  6. Hey- no wonder I tend to like your philosophy! Now if only everyone else would just agree...

    1. John Stuart Mill (100%)
    2. Kant (99%)
    3. Prescriptivism (72%)
    4. Jeremy Bentham (70%)
    5. Aquinas (65%)
    6. Jean-Paul Sartre (64%)
    7. Ayn Rand (63%)
    8. Aristotle (52%)
    9. Epicureans (50%)
    10. Stoics (45%)
    11. Spinoza (44%)
    12. St. Augustine (39%)
    13. Nel Noddings (36%)
    14. Plato (35%)
    15. Ockham (25%)
    16. David Hume (22%)
    17. Nietzsche (15%)
    18. Thomas Hobbes (13%)
    19. Cynics (0%)

    ReplyDelete
  7. My results, shortly after completing Carolyn Mason's 200-level Ethics class:
    1. Jeremy Bentham (100%)
    2. Jean-Paul Sartre (94%)
    3. John Stuart Mill (85%)
    4. Thomas Hobbes (78%)
    5. Aquinas (77%)
    6. Aristotle (63%)
    7. Ayn Rand (62%)
    8. Epicureans (58%)
    9. Plato (58%)
    10. David Hume (55%)
    11. Cynics (52%)
    12. Nietzsche (49%)
    13. Kant (45%)
    14. St. Augustine (42%)
    15. Nel Noddings (39%)
    16. Spinoza (35%)
    17. Stoics (32%)
    18. Prescriptivism (20%)
    19. Ockham (7%)

    Although to be honest, I'm still pretty undecided about meta-ethics, which seems strange to me. It seems like it must be such a burning question whether there is any moral truth, and I just can't decide.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Yey! another benthamite!
    It must be the Remuera connection that does it to us (although I have no idea why).

    ReplyDelete
  9. And another Cantabrian at that! (How curious! Did you fall upon my site by accident?) I took Carolyn's course last year, it was easily one of my favourites. Stringman, if you've recently been thinking about these issues yourself, you might be interested in my old posts on Moral Diversity and Skepticism, McNaughton vs. Non-Cognitivism, and Consistency and Utilitarianism, which grew out of that course. As for the "burning question", I think what really matters here is not necessarily the question of truth per se, but more the question of ideality. (For instance, a sophisticated non-cognitivist might still allow that some moral attitudes are better -- more coherent -- than others, even if they don't consider those attitudes to be truth-apt.)

    ReplyDelete

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